MAGA rioter who carried Confederate flag through US Capitol and son are released after arrest


The Delaware man who was photographed carrying a Confederate flag through the US Capitol during the January 6 riot and his son have been released with GPS monitoring hours after their Thursday arrest.  

Kevin Seefried and his son Hunter turned themselves in to authorities in Wilmington, Delaware, on Thursday morning, the FBI announced. 

Kevin is accused of trespassing and strutting through the Capitol with the controversial flag in hand and his son Hunter is accused of helping smash a glass window into a Senate building through which MAGA rioters entered the Capitol.

Seefried and his son, Hunter, are both charged with misdemeanor counts of trespassing and disorderly conduct.  Hunter also faces an additional charge of destruction of property, authorities say.

The two men appeared in federal court in Wilmington to face charges from the Capitol siege Thursday evening and were freed as they await their next hearing. 

They agreed to location monitoring, were ordered to not leave the state – except for a potential court date in Washington – and can only leave their homes for work, worship, or medical needs. 

Delaware man Kevin Seefried (left), who was photographed at the Capitol riot on January 6 carrying a Confederate flag, and his son Hunter Seefriend (right) pictured above entering a Wilmington office building after their first court appearance on Thursday. They were arrested Thursday morning and allowed to be freed with GPS location monitoring ahead of their next hearing

Kevin Seefried pictured walking with an unidentified woman after his first court appearance on Thursday. He and Hunter are both charged with misdemeanor counts of trespassing and disorderly conduct. Hunter also faces an additional charge of destruction of property for smashing a glass window into the Capitol building, authorities say

Kevin Seefried pictured walking with an unidentified woman after his first court appearance on Thursday. He and Hunter are both charged with misdemeanor counts of trespassing and disorderly conduct. Hunter also faces an additional charge of destruction of property for smashing a glass window into the Capitol building, authorities say

Caught on camera: The FBI identified Seefield, of Laurel Delaware, as the man who strutted through the US Capitol building carrying a controversial Confederate flag, which is associated with white supremacy and slavery

Caught on camera: The FBI identified Seefield, of Laurel Delaware, as the man who strutted through the US Capitol building carrying a controversial Confederate flag, which is associated with white supremacy and slavery

Seefried and his son Hunter pictured above during the January 6 Capitol seige

Seefried and his son Hunter pictured above during the January 6 Capitol seige 

The FBI says that Hunter Seefried was among those who shattered a window and climbed through along with scores of other protesters during the Capitol riot on January 6

The FBI says that Hunter Seefried was among those who shattered a window and climbed through along with scores of other protesters during the Capitol riot on January 6

The father and son could face more than a decade in prison and $250,000 in fines, according to statements made at Tuesday’s hearing, depending on whether thy’re ultimately charged as felonies or misdemeanors, according to Delaware Online.

Court documents cite video footage from the riot which allegedly shows Hunter helping to break a window allowing him and scores of other protesters to enter the Capitol building at around 2:13pm on January 6.

Both Hunter and his father are alleged to have climbed through the window.

In court papers, federal investigators attached several images of screenshots from cell phone video taken by rioters.

Hunter is alleged to be cleaning up part of the glass from the window that was shattered just moments before he and scores of other rioters climbed through and into the Capitol building.

The father and son are alleged to have been part of a group that ‘verbally confronted’ several Capitol Police officers.

Seefried looked serious as he walked away from his first court appearance Thursday. The two men agreed to location monitoring, were ordered to not leave the state - except for a potential court date in Washington - and can only leave their homes for work, worship, or other medical needs, ahead of their next hearing

Seefried looked serious as he walked away from his first court appearance Thursday. The two men agreed to location monitoring, were ordered to not leave the state – except for a potential court date in Washington – and can only leave their homes for work, worship, or other medical needs, ahead of their next hearing

Hunter Seefried pictured being consoled by two unidentified woman after his first court appearance with his father Thursday evening

Hunter Seefried pictured being consoled by two unidentified woman after his first court appearance with his father Thursday evening

Hunter is accused of breaking a glass window to get into the Capitol window during the violent riot that left five people dead

Hunter is accused of breaking a glass window to get into the Capitol window during the violent riot that left five people dead

Kevin Seefriend and his son Hunter along with two unidentified woman pictured after their first court appearance Thursday

Kevin Seefriend and his son Hunter along with two unidentified woman pictured after their first court appearance Thursday

Earlier this week, the FBI asked for the public's help in identifying the Trump supporter who carried the Confederate flag while he participated in the riot at the Capitol.

Earlier this week, the FBI asked for the public’s help in identifying the Trump supporter who carried the Confederate flag while he participated in the riot at the Capitol. 

Kevin and Hunter Seefried were seen standing alongside the 'QAnon Shaman' Jacob Chansley (seen in the viking hat on the right)

Kevin and Hunter Seefried were seen standing alongside the ‘QAnon Shaman’ Jacob Chansley (seen in the viking hat on the right)

The FBI identified Hunter Seefried as the man in the black leather jacket and dark-colored baseball cap who was among the first to climb through one of the windows leading into the Capitol building

Images of the mob breaking the windows and climbing through into the Capitol went viral on January 6

The allegations against Kevin and Hunter Seefried were fleshed out in a court document filed by federal investigators on Wednesday

The allegations against Kevin and Hunter Seefried were fleshed out in a court document filed by federal investigators on Wednesday

The allegations against Kevin and Hunter Seefried were fleshed out in a court document filed by federal investigators on Wednesday

Hunter is allegedly seen taking a ‘selfie photograph’ during the riot.

Federal authorities say that Kevin and Hunter left the Capitol at 2:36pm, less than half an hour after breaching the building’s grounds.

According to court documents, the FBI received a tip from a co-worker of Hunter.

The co-worker told investigators that Hunter ‘bragged about being in the Capitol with his father.’

The FBI circulated images and video on social media asking the public for help in locating the man with the Confederate flag.

Images of the father and son were circulated showing them standing alongside the ‘QAnon Shaman,’ Jacob Chansley. 

Chansley, the Arizona man who took part in the insurrection while sporting face paint, no shirt and a furry hat with horns made his first court appearance on Monday. 

A judge scheduled a detention hearing on Friday for Chansley, who has been jailed on misdemeanor charges since surrendering to authorities over the weekend in Phoenix. 

He took part in the hearing by phone from a detention facility. 

The FBI identified Chansley from images taken during the riot showing his distinctive sleeve tattoos. Chansley was inside the Capitol and on the Senate dais as he carried a U.S. flag on a pole topped with a spear. 

He hasn’t yet entered a plea on charges of entering a restricted building without lawful authority, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. 

The Seefrieds were also seen next to another prominent rioter, Aaron Mostofsky, the son of a Brooklyn Supreme Court judge. 

FBI agents arrested Aaron Mostofsky, 34, who is the son of Judge Shlomo Mostofsky, in New York on Tuesday morning. He cried when he appeared in court and now faces up to 10 years behind bars. 

Aaron Mostofsky was released on a $100,000 bond. 

Kevin and Hunter sat down with the FBI for ‘voluntary’ interviews on Tuesday.

They told investigators that they participated in the riot at the Capitol.

Kevin confirmed that he brought his Confederate flag, which he normally flies on the outside of his home in Laurel, Delaware, to the Capitol.

Kevin told investigators that he and his son traveled to Washington, DC, to listen to President Trump address the ‘Save America March’ rally near the White House a short time before protesters stormed the US Capitol.

According to the FBI, Kevin Seefried said that he brought his Confederate flag which he normally flies on the outside of his home in Laurel, Delaware

According to the FBI, Kevin Seefried said that he brought his Confederate flag which he normally flies on the outside of his home in Laurel, Delaware 

The father and son (seen second and third from left) are alleged to have been part of a group that ‘verbally confronted’ several Capitol Police officers

The father and son (seen second and third from left) are alleged to have been part of a group that ‘verbally confronted’ several Capitol Police officers

The Seefrieds were also seen next to another prominent rioter, Aaron Mostofsky, the son of a Brooklyn Supreme Court judge

The Seefrieds were also seen next to another prominent rioter, Aaron Mostofsky, the son of a Brooklyn Supreme Court judge

Aaron Mostofsky leaves Brooklyn Federal court after being arraigned on being part of the mob that stormed the Capitol on Tuesday

Aaron Mostofsky leaves Brooklyn Federal court after being arraigned on being part of the mob that stormed the Capitol on Tuesday

Shown crying in court, Mostofsky was ordered released on $100,000 bond along with other restrictions that include GPS monitoring. Mostofsky also must surrender his passport

Shown crying in court, Mostofsky was ordered released on $100,000 bond along with other restrictions that include GPS monitoring. Mostofsky also must surrender his passport

The FBI says that Kevin and Hunter walked to the Capitol together with a group that was ‘led by an individual with a bull horn.’

Records indicate that a construction business, K&E Construction LLC, was once registered to Kevin Seefried’s name, according to the Delaware News Journal.

It now appears that the business license linked to a separate address in Laurel is no longer valid.

The violence, which left five dead, led to the impeachment of Trump on Wednesday by the House of Representatives on a charge of inciting an insurrection.

Shortly before the attack, Trump had fired up a crowd of supporters, repeating his baseless claims that he won the election and urging them to go to the Capitol.

Many of the people arrested so far were captured on social media bragging about taking part in the assault, and the FBI has been combing through more than 100,000 videos and photographs. 

Jacob Anthony Chansley, the heavily-tattooed Trump supporter who sported horns, a fur hat and face paint as he occupied the Senate dais, was arrested on Saturday and appeared in court in Phoenix by video-link on Monday

Jacob Anthony Chansley, the heavily-tattooed Trump supporter who sported horns, a fur hat and face paint as he occupied the Senate dais, was arrested on Saturday and appeared in court in Phoenix by video-link on Monday

Jacob Anthony Chansley is pictures as he occupied the Senate dais at the US Capitol last week

Jacob Anthony Chansley is pictures as he occupied the Senate dais at the US Capitol last week

After the violence was quelled, most of the rioters were allowed to leave the Capitol, meaning law enforcement has had to track them down in the days since.

The Justice Department has brought more than 70 criminal cases so far since supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the Capitol on January 6, trying to prevent Congress from certifying Joe Biden as the winner of the US presidential election.

Federal authorities on Thursday moved forward with more arrests and indictments. 

Chansley has previously admitted his belief in QAnon after he started after reading conspiracy theories on the internet

 Chansley has previously admitted his belief in QAnon after he started after reading conspiracy theories on the internet

A retired firefighter suspected of throwing a fire extinguisher at police during the attack has been arrested, a Justice Department spokeswoman confirmed on Thursday.

Robert Sanford, 55, of Chester, Pennsylvania, will appear in a virtual hearing in federal court in Allentown, Pennsylvania on Thursday to face charges of unlawful entry, civil disorder and assaulting, resisting or impeding police.

According to court documents, Sanford was captured on video hurling what appears to be a fire extinguisher at police.

‘The object appears to strike one officer, who was wearing a helmet, in the head. The object then ricochets and strikes another officer, who was not wearing a helmet, in the head. The object then ricochets a third time and strikes a third officer, wearing a helmet, in the head,’ the documents say.

Hunter Ehmke was also charged by the Justice Department on Thursday with damaging government property, obstructing an official proceeding and violent entry.

According to court documents, a Capitol Police officer witnessed Ehmke smash a window at the Capitol and rushed at him with his shield to try to stop him.

The officer ‘lost grip of the shield and fell’ into shards of glass, the documents say.

Police managed to detain Ehmke but the crowd started to become aggressive and threatened police not to take Ehmke away.

‘Due to the growing aggression of the large crowd that far outnumbered the officers and the exigent circumstances at the time, officers made the decision to allow Ehmke depart under his own power,’ investigators said in court papers.

Another person who has since been indicted is Douglas Austen Jensen of Iowa, whom federal agents describe in court records as a supporter of the far-right conspiracy theory QAnon.

Jensen, according to the charging documents, is the man who was captured on video by the Guardian newspaper taunting a lone Black Capitol Police officer as he led a crowd that was encroaching up a stairwell. 

Doug Jensen was arrested on Saturday, having led the mob against Eugene Goodman

He was booked into the Polk County Jail early Saturday on five federal charges, including trespassing and disorderly conduct counts, according to news releases from the FBI’s field office in Omaha, Nebraska and the county sheriff’s office.

Douglas Austen Jensen was arrested on Saturday, having led the mob against Eugene Goodman.  He was booked into the Polk County Jail early Saturday on five federal charges, including trespassing and disorderly conduct counts, according to news releases from the FBI’s field office in Omaha, Nebraska and the county sheriff’s office.

Jensen approached in a ‘menacing manner, with the crowd following behind him, forcing the officer to continue to retreat,’ the documents say.

Jensen later turned himself in to the Des Moines Police Department.

He admitted being the person in the video, saying he ‘intentionally positioned himself to be among the first people inside the United States Capitol because he was wearing his ‘Q’ T-shirt and he wanted to have his T-shirt seen on video so that ‘Q’ could ‘get the credit,’ the documents say.  



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